• Have you ever made training that got hyped but then never saw the light of day? Or bent over backwards to reach goals that (oops!) actually hurt people more than helped them? Any experience delivering learning that got so confused along the way that it no longer made any sense to the learners...or to the business? Through no fault of ours, some training projects are simply doomed from the start. If you haven't run into one yet, consider yourself lucky. Stick around long enough and this luck will change. Even with the best of intentions, schtuff happens. There are all sorts of reasons that good training projects go bad. If you've planned to 100% of your budget or your timeline with no

    Dec 26,
  • Google had a problem. Their vitally-important YouTube Partners didn’t understand how to use YouTube’s complex backend systems. They were relying on classroom training to certify such professionals, but were only training about 1,000 professionals a year. My colleagues and I solved this problem by developing 90 videos in eight weeks thereby creating the YouTube Certified Online training program. During the following year, nearly 10,000 professionals took the training, a 10-fold increase. We made the videos. We scripted them, directed them, led the production team & post-production team, and then uploaded everything to the learning management system (LMS) and built out the exam and all the behind-the-scenes stuff that makes it all work. Pulling off such a huge transformation in such a short

    Dec 18,
  • Some people claim that multiple choice questions are a bad idea. But just because a tool can be misused doesn't make that tool bad. Multiple choice assessments can be very valuable if done right, and they do happen to be the standard in all forms of testing and surveying, anyway. So let's make them correctly, shall we? Here's a quick summary of my 15+ years of experience on how to do that: Have 4-5 answer options. No less, no more (and NO True/False). Link every question to a specific learning objective or behavioral outcome. Know exactly what are you measuring, and why, and how. Expect the question and answer take 20% of your design time, and writing effective distractors that

    Dec 12,
  • We don't like to think of ourselves as lazy. So obviously I’m talking about other people here. You know, the ones who aren't curious to learn new stuff or change what they're doing, even if it's not working out that great. In other words, most people, most of the time, and most especially the ones we are asked to make learning for every day. We can try and pump them up, we can shame, we can blame, and we may win some of them over for a little bit. But not all of them, and not for long. Fortunately, we don't need to change their behavioral state, we only need to change their actual behavior. We can choose to adapt to the learner's very predictably lazy ways. "Designing

    Dec 05,
  • As mentioned in a recent post, I presented at an L&D conference for the very first time two years ago. While I had applied to do so several times as President of Snap Synapse LLC, it was not until I had YouTube/Google in the client list that anyone said "yes". Funny thing about that ;) Since then I've been on a roll, presenting dozens of sessions, workshops, and webinars for The eLearning Guild, Training Magazine, ATD International, among others. I've learned a lot, becoming a much better presenter. The learning journey was a main reason why I spoke at these conferences in the first place. Now, after my recent presentations at DevLearn, I'm finally presenting at the level that I

    Nov 27,

It all starts with a conversation

a +1-415-508-7627